Zuma to face more questions on corruption

Zuma to face more questions on corruption

South Africa’s former President Jacob Zuma will face a second day of questioning at a corruption inquiry on Tuesday.

On Monday, he rejected allegations that he was personally corrupt and said he was the victim of a decades-long conspiracy.

Less drama, and more detail is now expected from Mr Zuma, as he is obliged to answer specific allegations made against him by at least nine other previous witnesses.

The former president used his opening statement to the corruption inquiry to make claims about a conspiracy against him.

He suggested that the inquiry itself was the culmination of an intelligence plot to derail his career.

But Mr Zuma must now respond to the testimony of former cabinet ministers, and other senior officials, who allege that he used the presidency to enrich himself, his family, and his close friends, the Guptas.

On Monday Mr Zuma acknowledged that he might have urged officials to push government contracts towards the Gupta’s media companies. But he insisted he had done nothing improper or illegal.

The aim of this inquiry is to investigate and expose the rot of the Zuma era. But it is also part of a wider, and potentially explosive factional battle taking place within the governing ANC.

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