Injectable HIV/AIDs drugs could to replace oral pills

HIV/Aids

Scientists have revealed that the daily oral HIV/Aids pills could be replaced with injectable drug that will be given six times a year.

If approved the injectable formulation of HIV medicines could offer a highly effective therapt.

The injection — given every four or eight weeks — includes the drugs cabotegravir and rilpivirine.

The two are supposed to advance HIV treatment by reducing pill burden and providing convenience for people living with HIV.

Many people struggle to swallow the drugs daily and in many cases resulted to a comeback and resistance.

“We have made considerable advances in the treatment of HIV over the last several decades,” said study lead author Dr. David Margolis. “But for many patients living with HIV, it still remains a challenge to take daily oral medication, either because they are unable to or they choose not to. So it is important to find alternatives.”

The report was published online July 24 in the journal The Lancet, to coincide with presentation of the results of the trial at the International AIDS Society meeting in Paris, France.

In the study, 286 patients were involved. The patients were randomly assigned to injections of cabotegravir plus rilpivirine every four or eight weeks, or to daily oral drugs.

After 32 weeks, HIV remained suppressed in 91 percent of those taking the drugs orally, in 94 percent of those receiving monthly injections and in 95 percent of patients receiving injections every two months, the researchers found

Nearly 37 million people around the world are living with HIV.

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